Welcome to Cypressdds Dentist
12462 Brookhurst St, Garden Grove, CA 92840

Dental Bridges: the How and Why

It’s only natural that your teeth are important to you. It’s also natural to want to replace a tooth as quickly as possible in the event you’re missing one. One of the most popular solutions for replacing missing teeth is the dental bridge.

At Cypress DDS, we’re Cypress, CA’s dental bridge experts. For years, our cosmetic and restorative dentists have put their skills to the test in order to help our patients restore confidence in their smiles, while simultaneously helping to restore functionality to their teeth. Fortunately, dental bridges help us accomplish both.

What is a Dental Bridge?

It might not surprise you, but a dental bridge is actually a lot like a bridge you would use to traverse a gap in the landscape. Except, in this case, the landscape is your smile and the bridge is a dental appliance (not a series of girders and supports). However, the concept is still the same.

One one of your teeth is missing, a dental bridge is used to replace it. In doing so, your dentist uses the adjacent healthy teeth as supports. These teeth are given crowns as additional reinforcement and support. Just like a bridge over a body of water, this is done to help spread the pressure and weight across the entire structure – rather than place it all on the bridge itself.

In your mouth, once the supports for the bridge have been created with crowns, your dentist installs a pontic. The pontic is an artificial tooth which is installed between the crowns and matched to your existing teeth in order to fill-in the space. As dental technology and the materials available have become better and better, dental bridges have also become stronger and more life-like. In many cases, friends and family alike won’t be able to tell you’ve had a replacement tooth installed at all.

Why Replacing a Missing Tooth is About More than Just “Looking Good”

Many patients don’t realize that getting a dental bridge is about more than just improving the look of your smile. In fact, filling the gaps made by missing teeth is actually an important step your dentist will encourage you to take for the good of your long-term oral health.

Dental bridges are about more than just appearance because the gaps they’re filling can make a very real impact in the balance of your bite.  Because the missing tooth is no longer there to help support the teeth adjacent to it,  losing a tooth can gradually cause your remaining teeth to fall out of alignment. This not only impacts your ability to eat, but it will also impact your ability to speak. By installing a dental bridge and filling the gap between your teeth, you ensure that your entire smile maintains its proper shape.

Do you have questions about dental bridges? The dental team at Cypress DDS is here to help. If you’re a patient in the Cypress area, schedule a free consultation today. To learn more, come back to visit our blog often. 

Common Questions about Root Canals

Root canal therapy is a common dental procedure used to save a tooth that’s become infected. Put simply, when bacteria makes its way to the inside of your tooth, infection and inflammation can spread to the dental pulp and the root canal – which rests inside and underneath each of your teeth.

At Cypress DDS, we frequently help patients preserve their teeth with expert root canal treatment in Cypress, CA. Learn more about the procedure and the many questions that patients have about it below.

Unfortunately, root canal treatment (often simplified to: “Root canal”) has a reputation for being painful and uncomfortable. This leads us to the first most frequently asked questions about root canal treatment:

“Is Root Canal Treatment Painful?”

You’ll be happy to know the answer here is: no. The reputation root canals have for being painful comes from a combination of misconceptions. First, dental science has come a long way. Years ago, patients had to bear drilling and cleaning of the root canal with limited anesthesia – which had a tendency to be very painful. On top of this, the pain associated with the toothache from an infected root canal also makes patients assume the procedure is painful. In reality, root canal treatment with modern anesthesia is virtually painless and no more uncomfortable than a common filling. If you’re nervous about pain and discomfort and think you might need a root canal, realize this: root canal treatment is designed to alleviate pain, not cause it.

What symptoms are associated with the need for root canal therapy?

There are occasions when there are actually no symptoms present when a patient needs root canal treatment. However, more often than not, there are a few indicators and they are generally hard to ignore.

  • Sensitivity that persists after hot or cold stimuli have been removed.
  • Severe pain when you apply pressure to a tooth while eating
  • A tooth that’s become disccolored over time
  • Gums that are swollen, tender, or bleeding near a painful tooth
  • A pimple-like bump on your teeth

How to avoid needing a root canal

Apart from regular visits to your dentist, the best way to avoid the need for root canal treatment is to take good care of your teeth, that means regular brushing (twice to three times a day) and flossing, while also working to minimize bacteria in your mouth with mouth washes and other anti-bacterial rinses.

What are the causes of a root canal?

Generally, the causes of infection or inflammation that lead to the need for root canal treatment center around bacteria that reaches its way to the inside of your tooth. This can come from the following source:

  • A tooth that’s been injured or broken
  • Dental procedures performed on the same tooth
  • A deep, untreated cavity

Have more questions about root canals? For patients in Cypress, CA we’re here to help. Contact us today to schedule a consultation and wave goodbye to pain. 

A Brief Introduction to Your Baby’s Teeth by a Family Dentist in CYPRESS, CA

Whether you just had your first child or you’re making a lovely addition to an already very busy family, it’s never uncommon for questions to arise from parents, whether they’re new to being parents, or seasoned pros — hardened in the battlefield of bottles and late-night diaper duty.

More often than not, the most common questions parents ask about new babies pertain to the odd rash, stomach ache, fever, and a litany of other issues ranging from how long it’s normal for a baby to cry to how a baby should be sleeping at night.

Unfortunately, few of the questions asked about newborn health tend to be about a newborn’s teeth. We don’t particularly blame parents for this. After-all,  a newborn doesn’t have teeth. With that said, it’s easy to let oral health fly under the radar.

However, even though your baby doesn’t have teeth, it’s important to find your newborn family dentist nearby, especially if you can find a dentist that specializes in pediatric care. One of the best reasons? An oral health risk assessment

Your Baby’s First Dentist Appointment (by 6 months of age) 

According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, performing an oral health risk assessment is incredibly important for infants. Put simply: this visit allows your dentist to spot the potential for any problems that could arise in the future. It assesses your baby’s risk for conditions relating to the hard and soft tissues of the mouth, as well as the potential risk for dental caries, and make suggestions for your baby’s fluoride needs.

Why baby teeth are Important

Parents occasionally believe that their baby’s teeth aren’t incredibly important because they’re just (eventually) replaced with adult teeth. This is one of the first misconceptions a good family dentist will squash right away.  Your baby’s first teeth are important for the development of healthy adult teeth by helping to properly space permanent teeth, while also aiding the development of speech and the ability to chew.

How to Brush a Baby’s Teeth

Even if your baby is “all gums” it’s still important to gently brush, it’s still important to brush very gently with a small amount of fluoridated toothpaste. If teeth have not yet come-in, a warm and damp washcloth will do. If possible, this should be done twice a day. The overarching goal: clean out the bacteria. Gently doing whatever you can to clean the bacteria out of your baby’s mouth is the name of the game.

Helpful Tip for Better Teeth: Follow Meals with Water (and bottle feeding before bed)

Many parents don’t realize that simply following every infant’s meal with water is a sure-fire way to reduce the risk for gingivitis and decay. By preventing gingivitis and decay early on, your baby’s teeth get an oral-health head start that can impact his or her smile for years and years to come.

On top of this, it’s important to remember that bottle-feeding anything but water before bed means that the bacteria from that food will continue to live in your child’s mouth all night – which can contribute to decay  and gingivitis.

Cypress Family Dentistry: 3 Simple Tips for Better Teeth

One of the most important tasks any good family dental clinic will undertake is the task of educating patients.

But education goes far beyond informing patients about how to instruct their children to properly brush their teeth, or when a dental bridge  should be used. While most patients understand that sugary drinks and candy can be detrimental to your teeth, many patients don’t realize that it’s all sugar that should be avoided, which leads us to our first tip:

For Healthier Teeth: Don’t Just Beware Sugar, Beware Carbs and Starches

While you might not look at potato chips and other starchy snacks as a dental risk, that’s because you’re not thinking about their chemistry. While they might not have a lot of sugar on their ingredient’s list, the starch in potato chips (and other starch-filled items) converts into sugar after you’ve eaten them. If you’ve eaten or served snacks like these, follow them up with water whenever you can. Or, at the best you can opt instead for mixed nuts – which are ultimately more healthy and less likely to allow sugars to bathe your teeth.

Drink More Water

You would likely hear the same advice from your doctor, but don’t be surprised to hear it from your family dentist as well, that is: drink more water. Most dental patients don’t drink nearly enough water. Not only is it helpful to your body, but it also helps to wash away the bacteria in your mouth while neutralizing acid residue as well. If you’re consuming food or beverages that are acidic always remember to rinse, rinse rinse.  On top of this, if your children participate in sports and feel inclined to the occasional sports drink, be careful. While these drinks are okay from time to time, water is always better than a sugary sports drink that not only contains calories, but can also be an unnecessary burden on the teeth.

Brush: At the Right Time, with the Right Force

Nobody needs to be told that brushing your teeth is important. However, many patients do need to hear a few not-said-enough warnings about their teeth. First, don’t brush too hard. Brushing too hard for too long can eventually wear down your tooth’s enamel, while also contributing to gum erosion (which can contribute to sensitivity and other problems down the road). On top of not brushing too hard, it’s also important to consider the acid in your diet. Just like we mentioned it being important to wash away acid from your diet, it’s also important not to help it attack your teeth. Brushing too soon after eating acidic can contribute to accelerated erosion and abrasion. Due to this, it’s best to wait for about 30 minutes after eating to brush.